Another Low Dose Naltrexone story 1

A Low Dose Naltrexone story put together with one of our readers.

A question? Email us at info@questionsmisc.info.

Posted in Uncategorised | Comments Off on Another Low Dose Naltrexone story 1

Odds and ends

Something we’ve just come across – from 2013?

We’re looking into it.

Email us on info@questionsmisc.info.

Posted in Uncategorised | Comments Off on Odds and ends

Advising on and perhaps prescribing Low Dose Naltrexone NEVER to become common practice?

THE BOTTOM LINE: Perhaps the greatest medical breakthrough ever, NEVER EVER to become common practice?

One of our readers, a retired GP, says that over the years, (perhaps over the last 80 to 100 years???) there have been four really significant medical breakthroughs – Antibiotics, Antidepressants, Anti-inflammatories, and Immunization. And he says that to these four can now be added a fifth, which he says is as significant as any of them – Low Dose Naltrexone.

And he also says that he read once that, on average, it takes 17 years for medical breakthroughs to become common practice!!!!!

Putting these two things together is disturbing enough, but there’s far more disturbing news in relation to Low Dose Naltrexone – and that is that prescribing it may NEVER become common practice!!!!!

Why, you may ask.

Because what usually happens, is that when a new drug is discovered, the big pharmaceutical companies, (often referred to as “Big Pharma,”) having taken patents out on it, carry out extensive testing on it, (which always costs lots of money,) to the point that government approval is granted for it’s treatment for such and such health problems. So that when you see a doctor, they are normally going to say, “Right, you’ve got such and such health problems, and these are the medications with government approval for the treatment of these problems,” – doctors don’t usually take any other approach, they don’t usually prescribe anything that doesn’t have this government approval. So that Big Pharma makes it’s money by supplying these medications, which their competitors are precluded from supplying by the laws that apply to patents – until their patents run out, after 20 years or so.

But this is NEVER going to happen with Low Dose Naltrexone.

Again, you may ask why?

Because Naltrexone was discovered in 1965, and government approval was eventually gained for it’s treatment of patients dependent on heroin, with 50 mg doses. But, by the time it started  to be discovered how effective it was when taken in doses as small as 5mg or so, (hence the name, “Low Dose Naltrexone,”) all the patents on it had run out. So Big Pharma was/is NEVER going to outlay the money required to get government approval for it’s uses in this way, for the very good reason that they feel they are never going to be able to get their money back in the way that they do when they are an exclusive supplier.

And we feel there’s another factor here, in that the main uses of Low Dose Naltrexone are preventative – to prevent patients from suffering various health problems. And doctors are just not used to prescribing anything if there’s nothing wrong with you at present, and you just want help in preventing you from getting problems in the future.

So, is it too much to hazard a guess that prescribing Low Dose Naltrexone may NEVER become common practice, NEVER NEVER?

Apparently, according to one of our readers, Low Dose Naltrexone may be of help to patients of neurologists, rheumatologists, gastroenterologists, dermatologists and immunologists, and we have sent over 50 emails to different Sydney specialists practicing in these fields, asking if “advising on and perhaps prescribing Low Dose Naltrexone” was within their areas of expertise, and if not whether they could recommend anyone who does it – and have got no more than 3 or 4 replies, (the other 50 emails have been ignored,) each indicating “no” and “no.” Seems like prescribing Low Dose Naltrexone is not going to become “common practice” any time soon, in Sydney at least, doesn’t it?

(A story that fascinates us, and is perhaps only partly relevant, which may be too good to be true! Peter Drucker, the famous management writer, used to claim that the conventional wisdom in 1911 was that the best way to discover ways to kill bacteria was to first grow significant cultures of them to experiment on. And that, in 1911, penicillin was fully known, understood and documented as a pesky fungus that used to hinder the growth of these significant cultures. And that it was more than 25 years later that it started to occur to people, “Hey, penicillin may be what we’ve been looking for all this time – something that kills our bacteria.” Oops!)

A comment or a question? Email us at info@questionsmisc.info.

Posted in Uncategorised | Comments Off on Advising on and perhaps prescribing Low Dose Naltrexone NEVER to become common practice?

Remarkable Low Dose Naltrexone stories 3 – continued.

Further to our previous post, we have worked with our reader to put together a further instalment to his story.

That’s how it is readers! WHAT IS GOING ON? We believe that the whole world should be on Low Dose Naltrexone, but for reasons unknown, perhaps because of an ABSOLUTE SCANDAL, it’s not happening.

Posted in Uncategorised | Comments Off on Remarkable Low Dose Naltrexone stories 3 – continued.

Remarkable Low Dose Naltrexone stories 3

A Low Dose Naltrexone story put together with one of our readers:-

Email us at info@questionsmisc.info.

Posted in Uncategorised | Comments Off on Remarkable Low Dose Naltrexone stories 3

Remarkable Low Dose Naltrexone stories 2

We’ve set out below another remarkable Low Dose Naltrexone story from Linda Elsegood’s book – from a Californian doctor, Dr Jill Cottell.

Posted in Uncategorised | Comments Off on Remarkable Low Dose Naltrexone stories 2

Remarkable Low Dose Naltrexone stories 1

We have set out below Linda Elsegood’s introduction to her book – no wonder she’s such an enthusiast for Low Dose Naltrexone and appears to be devoting her life to spreading the Low Dose Naltrexone message!

(No doubt we’re breaking all sorts of copyright laws by adding this introduction to our blog in the way we have, but we are simply wanting to motivate our readers to go out and buy the book for themselves.)

For your comments and answers to any questions we may be able to provide, and to provide us with any relevant information you may have, email us at mail@medicalquestionsandanswers.net

Posted in Uncategorised | Comments Off on Remarkable Low Dose Naltrexone stories 1

The LDN book 2

There are various YouTube videos in which, Linda Elsegood, the author of “The LDN book,” tells her remarkable story.

Posted in Uncategorised | Comments Off on The LDN book 2

The LDN book 1

We have recently become aware of this book:-

and these reviews on it.

A note on its author/editor.

For more on it, use this link.

You would think that if there was any widespread interest in Australia in Low Dose Naltrexone at all, that you could visit just about any bookshop in Australia and buy a copy of what seems to be such a valuable book on the subject. But no, when we sought to buy it at one particular bookshop, we were told that not only did they not have it in stock, but that there wasn’t a bookshop in the whole of Australia that had it in stock – so we had to put an order in to get a copy from overseas involving a delay of 2 or 3 weeks before it arrived.

To us, this is just typical of a situation which we’re finding to be more and more extraordinary – how nothing seems easy for those who might want to try using LDN. This sort of thing, along with how hard it seems to be to find doctors who know anything about it, let alone who are prepared to prescribe it. And the fact, that even if we ever got a prescription, we’re not expecting it to be easy to find a pharmacy to fill it.

For your comments and answers to any questions we may be able to provide, and to provide us with any relevant information you may have, email us at mail@medicalquestionsandanswers.net

Posted in Uncategorised | Comments Off on The LDN book 1

The Case for Low Dose Naltrexone

It’s said that there are “over 60 hormones, 10 main neurotransmitters, over 20 endorphins and thousands of other chemicals” in our bodies, which, if they are “normal and working well,” help us to live healthy, happy and effective lives, free from addictions, sicknesses, diseases and so on. And that what Low Dose Naltrexone does is help us live like that, not by, in itself, helping us to live like that, but by helping our bodies to help us live lives like that. In other words case seems so strong

So, to us, the questions are raised, “Why shouldn’t we all be on Low Dose Naltrexone? Why aren’t we all on it.”

Is it too expensive? No, it’s not, it’s cheap to produce.

Is it onerous to be on? No, it simply involves taking simple medication, like any other simple medication, once a day.

Are there any other downsides? There don’t seem to be.

The answer seems to lie in how difficult it is to find a doctor, at least in Sydney, Australia, who knows enough about it to prescribe it for patients.

As we’ve mentioned, we sent out 16 emails to Sydney Neurologists, asking them whether “advising on and perhaps prescribing Low Dose Naltrexone” was within their “areas of expertise,” and if not, whether there was anyone else they “could recommend,” – and we haven’t got even one positive reply! (We intend to send out more as time allows.)

One doctor replied, and we quote, “LDN is said to be good for everything, (if you read the web,) and has been used for a few things such as MS. However, I’m not aware of any clear benefit to an otherwise fit and well person.”

Of course it’s not going to be of any clear benefit to an otherwise fit and well person – obviously all their body’s mechanisms, (for want of a better word,) are working well. But that’s not the point. The point is, why not take it to keep being fit and well? Or does one just start taking it when one has stopped being fit and well?

David Gluck, claims to have taken it every day for at least 15 years, and presumably he wouldn’t have kept taking it if he hadn’t felt it was doing him some good. But there seems to be no way for it to be determined whether he would have been fit and well anyway. But if you keep being fit and well, who cares?

Posted in Uncategorised | Comments Off on The Case for Low Dose Naltrexone