The LDN book 1

We have recently become aware of this book:-

and these reviews on it.

A note on its author/editor.

For more on it, use this link.

You would think that if there was any widespread interest in Australia in Low Dose Naltrexone at all, that you could visit just about any bookshop in Australia and buy a copy of what seems to be such a valuable book on the subject. But no, when we sought to buy it at one particular bookshop, we were told that not only did they not have it in stock, but that there wasn’t a bookshop in the whole of Australia that had it in stock – so we had to put an order in to get a copy from overseas involving a delay of 2 or 3 weeks before it arrived.

To us, this is just typical of a situation which we’re finding to be more and more extraordinary – how nothing seems easy for those who might want to try using LDN. This sort of thing, along with how hard it seems to be to find doctors who know anything about it, let alone who are prepared to prescribe it. And the fact, that even if we ever got a prescription, we’re not expecting it to be easy to find a pharmacy to fill it.

For your comments and answers to any questions we may be able to provide, and to provide us with any relevant information you may have, email us at mail@medicalquestionsandanswers.net

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The Case for Low Dose Naltrexone

It’s said that there are “over 60 hormones, 10 main neurotransmitters, over 20 endorphins and thousands of other chemicals” in our bodies, which, if they are “normal and working well,” help us to live healthy, happy and effective lives, free from addictions, sicknesses, diseases and so on. And that what Low Dose Naltrexone does is help us live like that, not by, in itself, helping us to live like that, but by helping our bodies to help us live lives like that. In other words case seems so strong

So, to us, the questions are raised, “Why shouldn’t we all be on Low Dose Naltrexone? Why aren’t we all on it.”

Is it too expensive? No, it’s not, it’s cheap to produce.

Is it onerous to be on? No, it simply involves taking simple medication, like any other simple medication, once a day.

Are there any other downsides? There don’t seem to be.

The answer seems to lie in how difficult it is to find a doctor, at least in Sydney, Australia, who knows enough about it to prescribe it for patients.

As we’ve mentioned, we sent out 16 emails to Sydney Neurologists, asking them whether “advising on and perhaps prescribing Low Dose Naltrexone” was within their “areas of expertise,” and if not, whether there was anyone else they “could recommend,” – and we haven’t got even one positive reply! (We intend to send out more as time allows.)

One doctor replied, and we quote, “LDN is said to be good for everything, (if you read the web,) and has been used for a few things such as MS. However, I’m not aware of any clear benefit to an otherwise fit and well person.”

Of course it’s not going to be of any clear benefit to an otherwise fit and well person – obviously all their body’s mechanisms, (for want of a better word,) are working well. But that’s not the point. The point is, why not take it to keep being fit and well? Or does one just start taking it when one has stopped being fit and well?

David Gluck, claims to have taken it every day for at least 15 years, and presumably he wouldn’t have kept taking it if he hadn’t felt it was doing him some good. But there seems to be no way for it to be determined whether he would have been fit and well anyway. But if you keep being fit and well, who cares?

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Low Dose Naltrexone is claimed to be SO effective – how is this effectiveness explained?

Low Dose Naltrexone is claimed to have beneficial effects when used to treat patients with any of the nearly 60 diseases listed in this post, for instance.

How is this effectiveness explained?

Not in terms of it fighting any of these diseases, but in terms of it’s strengthening the body’s own resources to fight these diseases.

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Why is Low Dose Naltrexone not more widely known and prescribed?

It’s said that over 300,000 people worldwide are taking LDN on a daily basis. But, if it’s as good as its claimed, why aren’t there 300 million?

Possible explanations?

Firstly.

Normally, when it’s thought that a new medication may have been discovered, there’s a pharmaceutical company that’s prepared to invest the large amounts of money needed to carry out the extensive research required to establish what conditions it may be the most useful to treat, and to get the approval of the FDA for it’s use in treating those conditions, as, if and when this approval has been obtained, the company ends up with an FDA approved medication on which patents have been obtained, which gives them a monopoly for long periods of time to manufacture and sell it. FDA approval has enormous significance for doctors in that they feel comfortable treating patients with conditions with medications that have it, and don’t feel nearly as comfortable treating patients with medications that don’t have it, if they’re prepared to prescribe it at all.

Note: The FDA, (Food and Drug Administration,) is the organisation in the US responsible for maintaining standards – the Australian equivalent is the TGA, (Therapeutic Goods Administration.)

These facts are so significant for Low Dose Naltrexone. Naltrexone, (as opposed to Low Dose Naltrexone – which isn’t a new drug, it’s just the same drug taken in smaller doses,) was first made in 1965 and WAS approved by the FDA in 1984 – but to treat people with an addiction to heroin, in 50 mg doses. But then subsequently, from about 1984 on, in something probably almost unique, it started to be found that the SAME DRUG taken in smaller doses was amazingly successful in treating people with a whole range of OTHER DIFFERENT health problems.

But, to quote David Gluck:-

https://www.lowdosenaltrexone.org/ldn_trials.htm

So, as someone else has said, “Naltrexone is old, out of patent and low cost, so LDN won’t be produced/marketed by big Pharma. They focus on new, patented, expensive medicines.”

So for those doctors thinking of prescribing Low Dose Naltrexone for their patients for all the conditions it’s supposed to help with, and for those patients thinking of using it any way for help with any of these condition, FDA approval ISN’T available, and isn’t likely to ever be avaialble

Secondly.

The great strength of LDN is claimed to be in it’s effectiveness in getting the body to strengthen it’s own mechanisms, (endorphins, immune systems, and so on,) to keep us fit and well and happy, and to fight diseases, pain, addictions etc. etc. BUT the problem is that it’s extraordinarily difficult and expensive to establish where these mechanisms are at. Everything would be so simple if one could say, “My body’s mechanisms were at such and such level, but after I’d been on LDN for a month they were at this other level.” But it appears that this is just not possible. As a result one feel as though they’re flying blind if they’re taking it

David Gluck says he started taking it every day in 2001, but at the end of 15 years or so of taking it, there’s no way he could know or say that he was any different to how he would have been if he hadn’t been taking it all those years.

Another aspect of this is that if your body’s mechanisms are already strong, going on to taking LDN every day is not going to make a scrap of difference.

The answer to this, of course, is what have you got to lose by going on to it – it’s only going to cost you 2 or 3 dollars a day, and it’s not going to cause you any harm. (We’re still checking this out.)

Of course, it’s going to be easy if you go onto it and experience an immediate benefit or benefits. One of our readers claims to have perhaps experienced 5 benefits – certainly 2 anyway – after only 2 or 3 weeks! If that sort of thing happens, of course, you’ll keep taking it. But it doesn’t always happen. If you feel no benefits, you are perhaps going to feel like an idiot if you keep taking it.

Thirdly.

To us, all the indications are that if every one in, say, Australia, started taking it, Australia would need 20% less doctors.

There seems to be a resistance to it amongst doctors that doesn’t make any sense, and perhaps this is the reason.

How else do you explain that when emails were recently sent to 16 Sydney neurologists asking them if they ever prescribed low dose naltrexone for their patients, and if not, did they know anyone who did, and not one of them answered “yes” to either of these questions?

Fourthly.

A lot of those, almost certainly the majority, who should be going on to Low Dose Naltrexone have nothing wrong with them – they should only be going on to it for preventative purposes. And doctors are just not used to treating people with nothing wrong with them, prescribing medications for preventative purposes.

If any of our readers knows of a better explanation of why Low Dose Naltrexone in not more widely known and prescribed, we would be grateful if they could let us know so we could direct other readers to it.

For your comments and answers to any questions we may be able to provide, and to provide us with any relevant information you may have, email us at mail@medicalquestionsandanswers.net

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How to start taking Low Dose Naltrexone as a “preventative measure” 2

If you’ve become convinced that taking Low Dose Naltrexone as a “preventative measure” might be a good idea, the next step is getting to know how to do it.

You’d think this was easy – just taking tiny amounts of a medication before you go to bed each night. And it is – except for perhaps two problems.

Firstly, finding a doctor in Sydney who will prescribe it.

Secondly, finding a pharmacist in Sydney who will fill your prescriptions.

We’re continuing our investigations.

For your comments and answers to any questions we may be able to provide, and to provide us with any relevant information you may have, email us at mail@medicalquestionsandanswers.net

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The History of Low Dose Naltrexone

A contribution from one of our readers:-

Apparently it’s not only the cost of doctors and hospitals, but medications too. We heard once from some one who makes a study of these things, that pills that sell for $1,200 each in the US can be bought for $5 in India.

Apparently, the Pharmaceutical Industry in the US (called “Big Pharma,”) is notorious for two things – the extent to which it is money hungry, and the extent to which it has influence amongst Governments.

These things are relevant when it comes to looking at the history of Low Dose Naltrexone –  it’s a real oddity.

It’s said that Naltrexone was first made in 1965 and approved for medical use in 1984 – but  at 50 mg daily, to treat people who had heroin addiction. But from about that time on, a Dr Bernard Bihari commenced making his pioneering discoveries that smaller doses of Naltrexone, almost certainly no higher than 4.5 mg, were amazingly successful in treating a broad scope of serious diseases.

To quote David Gluck:-

So as someone else has said, “Naltrexone is old, out of patent and low cost, so LDN won’t be produced/marketed by big Pharma. They focus on new, patented, expensive medicines.”

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How to start taking Low Dose Naltrexone as a preventative measure 1

Everything about Low dose Naltrexone seems extraordinary. Firstly because it’s said to have “beneficial effects” for those with 59 different diseases – see the list below taken from the lowdosenaltrexone.org website. (Not by fighting these diseases itself, but by making the body stronger in it’s abilities to fight these diseases.) But secondly, because, if it’s taken as a “preventative measure,” it can stop you from getting any of these 59 different diseases in the first place. In either case, simply by taking small inexpensive pills or powders each night. No wonder people are saying it’s up there with immunisation and antibiotics in it’s significance.

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A highly informative article by David Gluck on his experience with LDN

https://www.bestmedicalinfo1.com/posts/an-article-by-david-gluck-on-his-experience-with-ldn-which-is-highly-informative/

Or alternatively, to access this article, use this link.

For your comments and answers to any questions we may be able to provide, and to provide us with any relevant information you may have, email us at mail@medicalquestionsandanswers.net

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Low Dose Naltrexone Specialist Doctors in Low Dose Naltrexone – Sydney

We find this quite remarkable.

In the last month or so, this email has been sent to 16 Sydney Neurologists.

Only one of those who responded claimed to have any knowledge of LDN at all, and he was decidedly unenthusiastic about it’s benefits. For the rest, these responses were typical:-

“Dr XXX advices that he has no expertise in this area and is unaware of others who may be able to assist.”

And this from a 13 Neurologists practice:-

“None of the Drs at this practice prescribe low dose Naltrexone or have expertise in this area. Sorry.”

You’d think that there’d be one doctor in the whole of Sydney who’d bothered to learn about it – but if there is, we haven’t found him or her yet. Perhaps there are readers who know of someone.

The real irony is that, if any of the things that are being said about LDN are true, there must be doctors out their whose lives would be so much better, perhaps even saved, if they knew about it.

For your comments and answers to any questions we may be able to provide, and to provide us with any relevant information you may have, email us at mail@medicalquestionsandanswers.net

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Recommended Pharmacies – as suppliers of Low Dose Naltrexone

The lowdosenaltrexone.org website has a list on it of 9 pharmacies, with their phone and fax numbers, said to be “known to be reliable compounders of LDN,” shown at the end of this post. We have added their websites and ordinary email addresses, if available, as follows.

Belmar Pharmacy, Golden, CO Website: www.belmarpharmacy.com Ordinary email address: pharmacy@belmarpharmacy.com.

The Canandaigua Medicine Shoppe, Canandaigua, NY Website: canandaiguams.com. Website won’t open.

The Compounder, Aurora, IL Website: thecompounder.com No ordinary email address or email form found.

McGuff Compounding Pharmacy, Santa Ana, CA Website: www.mcguffpharmacy.com Ordinary email address: pharmacyanswers@mcguff.com.

The Medicine Store Pharmacy, Concord, NH Website:  www.vitals.com/pharmacy/medicine-store-74-s-main-st-concord-nh No ordinary email address or email form found.

Metro Drugs Integrative Pharmacy, New York, NY Website: www.metrointegrative.com Ordinary email address: info@metrointegrative.com.

Skip’s Pharmacy, Deerfield Beach, FL Website: www.skipspharmacy.com/wplog/ Email Form.

Dickson Chemist, Glasgow, Scotland Website: www.dicksonchemist.co.uk  Ordinary email address: info@dicksonchemist.co.uk.

Smith’s Pharmacy, Toronto, Canada Website: www.smithspharmacy.com Ordinary email address: info@smithspharmacy.com.

For your comments and answers to any questions we may be able to provide, and to provide us with any relevant information you may have, email us at mail@medicalquestionsandanswers.net

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